Buddy Guy Sweet Tea Blogspot

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Buddy Guy Sweet Tea Blogspot

One of Buddy Guy’s most uncompromising, unforgettable latter-day albums, Sweet Tea finds the Chicago-blues legend paying tribute to the Mississippi hill-country sound popularized by Fat Possum Records. Tackling tunes by blues heroes like Junior Kimbrough and Cedell Davis, Guy’s guitar work is raw, unhinged, and searing with indignation. When he rips into Kimbrough's 'Baby Please Don't Leave Me' or Davis' 'She Got the Devil in Her' atop overdriven bass and slam-bang drums, he sounds like a lion gnashing prey between its mighty teeth. Battle Spirits Digital Starter English Patch more. One of Buddy Guy’s most uncompromising, unforgettable latter-day albums, Sweet Tea finds the Chicago-blues legend paying tribute to the Mississippi hill-country sound popularized by Fat Possum Records. Tackling tunes by blues heroes like Junior Kimbrough and Cedell Davis, Guy’s guitar work is raw, unhinged, and searing with indignation. When he rips into Kimbrough's 'Baby Please Don't Leave Me' or Davis' 'She Got the Devil in Her' atop overdriven bass and slam-bang drums, he sounds like a lion gnashing prey between its mighty teeth. Buddy Guy is one of the most celebrated blues guitarists of his generation (and arguably the most celebrated), possessing a sound and style that embodied the traditions of classic Chicago blues while also embracing the fire and flash of rock & roll.

Find a Buddy Guy - Sweet Tea first pressing or reissue. Complete your Buddy Guy collection. Shop Vinyl and CDs. Hoyle Board Games 2001 Free Download. To record his intrepid new Silvertone/Jive Records album 'Sweet Tea,' due May 15, bluesman Buddy Guy says, 'They sent me down to Mississippi and said, 'Buddy, get on.

Stream Sweet Tea by Buddy Guy and tens of millions of other songs on all your devices with Amazon Music Unlimited. Exclusive discount for Prime members. Find album reviews, stream songs, credits and award information for Sweet Tea - Buddy Guy on AllMusic - 2001 - Apparently somebody took the criticisms of Buddy.

Guy spent much of his career as a well-regarded journeymen, cited as a modern master by contemporary blues fans but not breaking through to a larger audience, before he finally caught the brass ring in the 1990s and released a series of albums that made him one of the biggest blues acts of the day, a seasoned veteran with a modern edge. And few guitarists of any genre have enjoyed the respect of their peers as Guy has, with such giants as Eric Clapton, Jimi Hendrix, Jeff Beck, Keith Richards, Stevie Ray Vaughan, and Mark Knopfler all citing him as a personal favorite. George 'Buddy' Guy was born in Lettsworth, Louisiana on July 30, 1936, and is said to have first learned to play on a homemade two-string instrument fashioned from wire and tin cans. Guy graduated to an acoustic guitar, and began soaking up the influences of blues players such as T-Bone Walker, B.B.

King, and Lightnin' Hopkins; as his family relocated to Baton Rouge, Guy had the opportunity to see live performances by Lightnin' Slim (aka Otis Hicks) and Guitar Slim, whose raw, forceful sound and over the top showmanship left a serious impression on Guy. Guy started playing professionally when he became a sideman for John 'Big Poppa' Tilley, where he learned to work the crowd and overcome early bouts of stage fright. In 1957, Guy cut a demo tape at a local radio station and sent a copy to Chess Records, the label that was home to such giants as Muddy Waters, Howlin' Wolf, and Etta James, shortly before buying a one-way train ticket and moving to Chicago, eager to make music his career. Guy didn't enjoy immediate success in Chicago, and struggled to find gigs until his fiery guitar work and flashy stage style (which included hopping on top of bars and strutting up and down their length while soloing, thanks to a 100-foot long guitar cable) made him a regular winner in talent night contests at Windy City clubs. Guy struck up friendships with some of the city's best blues artists, including Muddy Waters, Otis Rush, Freddie King, and Magic Sam, and landed a steady gig at the 708 Club, where he became known as a talent to watch. In 1958, Magic Sam arranged for Guy to meet Harold Burrage, the owner of local blues label Cobra Records, and Guy was soon signed to Cobra's sister label Artistic Records. Willie Dixon produced Guy's debut single, 'Sit and Cry (The Blues),' as well as the follow-up, 'This Is the End,' but in 1959, Cobra and Artistic abruptly closed up shop, and like labelmate Otis Rush, Guy found a new record deal at Chess.